The Wartime Memories Project - STALAG LUFT 6 POW Camp



If you enjoy this site

please consider making a donation.



    Home


    Add Your Story

    Events

 Features

    Airfields of WW2

    Allied Forces

    Axis Forces

    Home Front

    Prisoner of War

    Secrets of WWII

    Ships of WWII

    Women at War

    Those Who Served

    Day-by-Day



    The Great War

 Submissions

    How to add Memories

    Add Your Memories

    Can you Answer?

    Printable Form

 Schools

    School Study Center

    Children's Bookshop

 FAQ's

    Your Family History

    Volunteering

    Visit where They Served

    Contact us

    News

    Bookshop

    About

    Links
Trace your family's war heros POW Records now available online!

World War 2 Two II WW2 WWII

Information.

The camp is situated on the old Prussian-Lithuanian border at Heydekrug, 40 kilometers Northwest of Tilsit. There was a second Stalag Luft 6 in mid-summer 1944, located in St. Wendel, SW Germany.



My father, Thomas Biggart, from Glasgow, Scotland was in the RAF Regiment, 2901 Squadron. He was captured on the island of Kos in the Aegean in October, 1943 and was a POW in Stalag Luft 4 and 6, he was on the so called 'death march' over the winter of 1945 after the camp was evacuated as the Russians approached. He ended in the war in Fallingbostal in April 1945. Many of his accounts mirror those of your contributors. The excellent book on the subject of the 'death march', The Last Escape by John Nicol and Tony Rennell (ISBN 0-141-00388-x) gives many accounts of POW's such as my father and when reading it I could recall my father's account of many of the stories in the book. They were all in it together. Dad always attributed his survival over that march to his comrades, and in particular to the system of the 'combine' where a small group of men shared everything and took care of one another. This was also the case in the camps. His memories of the war were many and as I look back now had a profound affect on the rest of his life, yet I never recall him being angry with the average German soldier- in fact he had empathy for them as they seemed to be a sorry lot towards the end. But he hated those in Gestapo and the SS, his accounts recall what a ruthless lot they were. Years later he told me of an incident when a Gestapo officer threw a brick of soap at him which hit him square in the face as he stooped down to pick up a photo of my mother, a bad lot he would say. His War Time Log book does however show that there were good times in the camps, my father was footballer and the camp soccer games, players and scores are all carefully recorded. His memories of the return to the UK are some of the most vivid. The clean sheets, the lovely nurses who cared for them, the smell of food although wonderful, were a shock to the system. But perhaps the most distressing thing to him was being separated from his mates in his combine. Those friends who he had lived with for the past years and who had kept one another alive. As he was suspect of suffering from TB he was kept isolated and did not have the opportunity to see his friends before they left for home. He did meet with them years later though- ironically, this was perhaps one of the toughest periods of the war for him. He remained in the RAF for almost 18 months after returning from Fallingbostal, mainly due to a fear that he had contracted TB, he hadn't fortunately and as a keen footballer focused on getting fit again to play in the regimental team. Before he died he left me with one gem which I know came from his war time POW experiences, he said, 'we must always share what we have'.



Stephen Albert Evans was a prisoner at Stalag Luft 6 for approx two and a half years. He was caught on the Island of Kos in the Greek Islands and was in the R A F Regiment and had the rank of LAC. He had his 21st birthday at the camp.

I would like to hear from anybody who knew him as he passed away in August 2000. He was born in Wales in a place called Talgarth were his widow still lives. He never used to speak about his war years to much, but as his son, I would be most grateful for anyone who knew him to get in touch with me.

The only name he mentioned was a chap called Fred Cidsey who was at the camp with him. I think he was in touch with him some years ago but lost touch I believe in the 70s so any information would be a bonus



My Uncle George Wright was a private man who seldom spoke about his wartime experiences before he passed away. I have come to understand recently however that he was a POW in Stalg Luft 6 after his plane went down over Luxemburg. He was a Mosquito gunner and suffered damaged kidney when the aircraft went down. Fortunately there was an Irish POW Surgeon who removed his kidney! When they were both demobbed the story is that the pair of them took their back pay and disappeared for several months together and remained good friends thereafter. Can you advise me how I may research his story more fully and find out more about my Uncle George.

Victor Wright





List of Prisoners

  • Eric Bickey
  • Thomas Biggart. RAF Regiment 2901 Squadron. Read his Story
  • Art "DOC" Blanchard (Bombardier USAAF)
  • Ken Bowden. 102 Sqd.
  • Fred Bowler
  • Fred Cidsey. Read his Story
  • LAC Stephen Albert Evans. RAF Regiment. Read his Story
  • Dickie Davis. 102 Sqd.
  • Bill Gilroy
  • Sgt J Hmenia. 300 Polish Squadron
  • Ron Lakin. 102 Sqd.
  • Alfred "wee Fred" McIntyre RAF
  • Allenby MacLennan. Nav. RAF.
  • Sgt C. Alf Miners. 50 Sqd. RAAF Read his story
  • Vic Oliver, DFM. RAF Read his story
  • Doug Pinney
  • Sgt G.E.Plowman. w/op 630 Sqd. RAF Read his story
  • Peter Thomas
  • Stan Tyson
  • F/S S.Willett DFM. pilot 50 Sqd. RAF Read his story
  • George Wright. air gunner. RAF.
  • Alick Yardley

If you have any names to add to this list please add their details.





If you have a story which you would like to share, or a website dedicated to a POW camp or prisoner of World War Two please get in touch. Add Your Story




Links







POW Index



The Wartime Memories Project is a non profit organisation.

This website is run out of our own pockets and from donations made by visitors. The popularity of the site means that it is far exceeding available resources.

If you are enjoying the site, please consider making a donation, however small to help with the costs of keeping the site running.

Or if you would like to send a cheque please email us for the postal address..





Website and ALL Material Copyright MM-MMIXI
- All Rights Reserved